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Passions in PoetryAstrophel and Stella
Eleventh Song
by Sir Philip Sidney

 

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Passions in Poetry Home > All Poems > Classic Poetry > Sir Philip Sidney > Astrophel and Stella > Sonnet XXXI Sonnet XXXI
Sir Philip Sidney
Poetry | Biography
Astrophel and Stella
Eleventh Song
by Sir Philip Sidney

"Who is it that this dark night
Underneath my window plaineth?"
`It is one who from thy sight
Being, ah! exiled, disdaineth
Every other vulgar light.'

"Why, alas! and are you he?
Be not yet those fancies changed?"
`Dear, when you find change in me,
Though from me you be estranged,
Let my change to ruin be.'

"Well, in absence this will die;
Leave to see, and leave to wonder."
`Absence sure will help, If I
Can learn how myself to sunder
From what in my heart doth lie.'

"But time will these thoughts remove:
Time doth work what no man knoweth."
`Time doth as the subject prove,
With time still the affection groweth
In the faithful turtle dove.'

"What if you new beauties see?
Will not they stir new affection?"
`I will think they pictures be,
Image-like of saint's perfection,
Poorly counterfeiting thee.'

"But your reason's purest light
Bids you leave such minds to nourish."
`Dear, do reason no such spite, -
Never doth thy beauty flourish
More than in my reason's sight.'

"But the wrongs love bears will make
Love at length leave undertaking."
`No, the more fools do it shake
In a ground of so firm making,
Deeper still they drive the stake.'

"Peace! I think that some give ear;
Come no more, lest I get anger."
`Bliss, I will my bliss forbear,
Fearing, sweet, you to endanger;
But my soul shall harbour there.'

Well, begone, begone, I say,
Lest that Argus' eyes perceive you."
`O unjust Fortune's sway,
Which can make me thus to leave you,
And from louts to run away!'

 

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