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Passions in PoetryThe Maid of Neidpath
by Sir Walter Scott

 

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Passions in Poetry Home > All Poems > Classic Poetry > Sir Walter Scott > Song To The Moon - Excerpt From Canto First Of Rockeby Song To The Moon - Excerpt From Canto First Of Rockeby
Sir Walter Scott
Poetry | Biography
The Maid of Neidpath
by Sir Walter Scott

O lovers' eyes are sharp to see,
And lovers' ears in hearing;
And love, in life's extremity,
Can lend an hour of cheering.
Disease had been in Mary's bower,
And slow decay from mourning,
Though now she sits on Neidpath's tower,
To watch her love's returning.

All sunk and dim her eyes so bright,
Her form decay'd by pining,
Till through her wasted hand, at night,
You saw the taper shining;
By fits, a sultry hectic hue
Across her cheek was flying;
By fits, so ashy pale she grew,
Her maidens thought her dying.

Yet keenest powers to see and hear
Seem'd in her frame residing;
Before the watch-dog pricked his ear
She heard her lover's riding;
Ere scarce a distant form was ken'd,
She knew, and waved to greet him;
And o'er the battlement did bend,
As on the wing to meet him.

He came—he pass'd—an heedless gaze,
As o'er some stranger glancing;
Her welcome, spoke in faltering phrase,
Lost in his courser's prancing.
The castle arch, whose hollow tone
Returns each whisper spoken,
Could scarcely catch the feeble moan
Which told her heart was broken.

 

Poem submitted by: Essorant

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Classic Home > Sir Walter Scott >> Song To The Moon - Excerpt From Canto First Of Rockeby Song To The Moon - Excerpt From Canto First Of Rockeby
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