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Passions in PoetryThe Courtship of the Yonghy-Bongy-Bo
by Edward Lear

 

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Passions in Poetry Home > All Poems > Classic Poetry > Edward Lear > The Jumblies The Jumblies
Edward Lear
Poetry | Biography
The Courtship of the Yonghy-Bongy-Bo
by Edward Lear

On the Coast of Coromandel
Where the early pumpkins blow,
In the middle of the woods
Lived the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.
Two old chairs, and half a candle, -
One old jug without a handle, -
These were all his worldly goods:
In the middle of the woods,
These were all the worldly goods,
Of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,
Of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

Once, among the Bong-trees walking
Where the early pumpkins blow,
To a little heap of stones
Came the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.
There he heard a Lady talking,
To some milk-white Hens of Dorking, -
"'Tis the Lady Jingly Jones!
On the little heap of stones
Sits the Lady Jingly Jones!"
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

"Lady Jingly! Lady Jingly!
Sitting where the pumpkins blow,
Will you come and be my wife?"
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.
"I am tired of living singly, -
On this coast so wild and shingly, -
I'm a-weary of my life;
If you'll come and be my wife,
Quite serene would be my life!" -
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

"On this Coast of Coromandel,
Shrimps and watercresses grow,
Prawns are plentiful and cheap,"
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.
"You shall have my chairs and candle,
And my jug without a handle! -
Gaze upon the rolling deep
(Fish is plentiful and cheap);
As the sea, my love is deep!"
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

Lady Jingly answered sadly,
And her tears began to flow, -
"Your proposal comes too late,
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!
I would be your wife most gladly!"
(Here she twirled her fingers madly)
"But in England I've a mate!
Yes! You've asked me far too late,
For in England I've a mate,
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

"Mr Jones -(his name is Handel, -
Handel Jones, Esquire, & Co.)
Dorking fowls delights to send,
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!
Keep, oh! keep your chairs and candle,
And your jug without a handle, -
I can merely be your friend!
- Should my Jones more Dorkings send,
I will give you three, my friend!
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

"Though you've such a tiny body,
And your head so large doth grow, -
Though your hat may blow away,
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!
Though you're such a Hoddy Doddy -
Yet I wish that I could modi-
fy the words I needs must say!
Will you please to go away?
That is all I have to say -
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!
Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!"

Down the slippery slopes of Myrtle,
Where the early pumpkins blow,
To the calm and silent sea
Fled the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.
There, beyond the Bay of Gurtle,
Lay a large and lively Turtle: -
"You're the Cove," he said, "for me;
On your back beyond the sea,
Turtle, you shall carry me!"
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!
Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

Through the silent-roaring ocean
Did the Turtle swiftly go;
Holding fast upon shell
Rode the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.
With a sad primaeval motion
Towards the sunset isles of Boshen
Still the Turtle bore him well.
Holding fast upon his shell,
"Lady Jingly Jones, farewell!"
Sang the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,
Sang the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

From the Coast of Coromandel
Did that Lady never go;
On that heap of stones she mourns
For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.
On that Coast of Coromandel,

In his jug without a handle,
Still she weeps, and daily mourns,
On that little heap of stones
To her Dorking Hens she moans,
For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,
For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

 

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